Cammell Laird targets ferry market with new environmental package

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Cammell LairdBirkenhead shipyard and engineering services company Cammell Laird says it has developed one of the most advanced ‘bespoke environmental’ packages for ferries in the shipyard industry, following its strongest year of trading in the sector.

Cammell Laird, one of the most famous names in maritime history, says it has docked 24 ferries between 2013 and the beginning of 2014 and, in addition, has carried out a further 24 afloat repairs for ferry operators.  During 2013 Cammell Laird repaired, built and converted almost 250,000 gross tons of ferry and Ro-Ro ships for a wide range of owners.

Already this year it has docked and repaired ferries of 150,000 gross tons and ferries worked on have included both conventional and high speed vessels in steel and aluminium. Customers include Caledonian MacBrayne, Isle of Man Steam Packet Company, Irish Ferries, Mersey Ferries, NorthLink Ferries, Orkney Ferries, P&O Ferries, Seatruck Ferries and Stena Line.

Cammell Laird Technical Manager Paul Ashcroft said ‘a massive challenge and focus’ for the sector moving forward was to find cost effective solutions to the new environmental standards ferry companies have to meet.

“There has never been greater pressure on ferry companies to become greener than now,” he said.

“As a result we have developed a highly advanced and specialised new environmental package addressing some of the hardest challenges. This covers carbon emissions, airborne pollution and the spread of aquatic nuisance species, in particular MARPOL Annex VI and the Ballast Water Management Convention, challenges that require considerable pre-planning.”

Mr Ashcroft said Cammell Laird’s green package has been developed to be bespoke and address the challenges faced by each individual ferry.

“There is not one simple solution to suit all vessels. Much depends on the type of ship, the geographical trading area, its age and operating profile. This is made harder by stretched ship management resources and the multitude of new, often competing, technologies. However, because we work on such a variety of vessels Cammell Laird is right at the forefront of these challenges.  This has led us to forge excellent links with a wide range of technology providers.  Those providers are working closely with our design engineers and naval architects to develop solutions with services ranging from initial feasibility studies to comprehensive turnkey retrofits.”

As an example Cammell Lairdhas recently completed a fleet study on a range of vessels for a ship owner to provide workscope and drawings to achieve class approvals for modifications, required for future emissions regulations in the North Sea.

“This has been a phenomenal year for ferry work for Cammell Laird,” said Mr Ashcroft. “We want to win more work in the sector from the Irish Sea and beyond and know we can offer customers many benefits of working with us.  The wide range of experience and expertise of our workforce plus our world class facilities means we can give our customers terrific service at great value.”

Other notable projects from the last year include a conversion contract from Orkney Ferries to lengthen the vessel Hoy Head from 39.5m to 53.3m.

“This increased the car capacity on the vessel from 14 to 24 cars or for up to three 16.5 metre HGVs and seven cars,” he said. “The £2.7m project was funded through the Council’s capital programme.  An 85-tonne midship section was built and inserted and all work to split and extend the vessel was completed in three days.

The project also included the installation of a complete new propulsion system including two Volvo Diesel Engines, two Rolls Royce Aquamaster thrusters and an additional bow thruster and engine; improving the manoeuvrability and carbon footprint of the vessel. Passenger and crew areas were also remodelled improving this vital service for residents, businesses and tourists for the Orkney Islands Council.”

During 2013 Cammell Laird also built and delivered two new passenger ferries to Western Ferries in Dunoon. Sound of Seil and Sound of Soay are double-ended 49.95m x 13.5m x 4m passenger, vehicle ferries with an open vehicle deck discharging fore and aft to linkspans at Hunter’s Quay, Dunoon and McInroy’s Point, Gourock, on the Firth of Clyde.

The ships are built to Lloyds Register A1 IWW with capacity for 200 passengers, up to 40 cars and the ability to load freight vehicles of 44 gross tonnes up to 14 tonne axle load. Propulsion is by two Rolls Royce Azimuth Thrusters, Type US 105/P6 CRP, one forward and one aft, each directly driven by a Cummins QSK19 diesel engine. The ships have a 60-seat passenger lounge, external passenger seating and crew facilities.

Mr Ashcroft said vessels docked, meanwhile, have ranged from the 46m, 611 GT “Royal Iris of the Mersey” to the 209m, 50938 GT “Ulysses” – fully utilising the four docks available at Cammell Laird suitable for all vessel types up to 40m beam.

“We also drydocked three of the NorthLink Ferries Fleet over the winter for overhaul and survey work,” he said. “This included the introduction of new livery to the vessels – Magnus the Viking which now adorns the side of the vessels.”

 

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